Living Beyond Travel Photography

Recently, I made a drastic life change that allowed me to completely re-evaluate my thoughts and practice of travel photography. I moved from Nashville, Tennessee to one of the most rural areas of the poorest country in the western hemisphere, Haiti. Normally when you think about travel photography experiences your mind journeys to a few

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Trip Report: Savannah, Georgia

There are a lot of famous photography locations in the United States. There are national parks like Yosemite, Death Valley, and Glacier that boast numerous photography spots. However, there are also many photography locations that aren’t necessarily less popular; they’re just less explored. In this post, we are going to examine the the less experienced

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Why Post-Processing Your Water Photos is Different

Whenever I’m teaching someone in a photography workshop or in a classroom setting, I always try to get them into a comfortable workflow they can follow for every photograph they edit. However, every photograph is different which forces the photographer to make decisions on some extra edits they should make. A workflow is important because

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The One Big Thing About Water Photography

If you’ve been an outdoor photographer for very long you might have noticed by now that you spend a lot of time near the water. There’s no doubt that water features add a lot to any landscape nature scene. Ponds are a tremendous feature to shoot with mountains, waterfalls are always a beautiful cascading subject,

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Tips for Better Adventure Photography

5 Tips for Better Adventure Photography

I’ve been in quite the quandary the past few months because I fear there is a division among some people who consider themselves to be outdoor photographers. On one side there is the old guard of outdoor photographers who desire to keep the shooting pure. It’s not outdoor photography unless it’s a photograph of only

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How to Photograph Shapes Instead of Landscapes

I believe that the three biggest concepts in photography are gear, composition, and post-processing. The smallest of those three is gear, the second smallest is post-processing, and the one that is most essential is composition. If I had to attach percentages to them, it would go like this: Gear: 10% Composition: 65% Post Processing: 25%

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