Winter Weather Photography Gear and Clothing Tips

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Duration: 8:26

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Want to shoot winter photos in one of the harshest environments of the world? Yellowstone National Park may be your ideal destination. This session will help you stay comfortable and safe while photographing beautiful animals in a pristine winter environment.

Shooting winter photos at Yellowstone National Park takes some serious preparation. In this session, professional photographers Doug Gardner and Jared Lloyd tell you all about shooting in the park in winter, including how to get ready for the trek with weather appropriate gear.

Winter is one of the most spectacular times of year to take photos of wildlife at Yellowstone. It’s also one of the harshest winter environments in the world. Photographing winter wildlife at Yellowstone National Park lets you watch and analyze how animals survive the winter climate, and it’s important for you the photographer to survive as well.

Weather Appropriate Gear Is Vital

Doug and Jared emphasize the importance of wearing headgear to prevent loss of body heat. You should wear a face covering as well to battle cold and wind. Layering clothing is important to keep out the cold, but also because you can remove layers when you do activity that causes you to sweat. They give tips and suggestions for what type of materials to avoid in cold situations, as well as items you may not have considered before, including waterproof gloves and boots, and goggles to avoid the risk of snow blindness. Additionally, hand warmers in your gloves can give you the opportunity to wear thinner gloves for better camera handling.

Choose Boots Carefully

When choosing boots, Doug recommends looking for a pair that can handle temperatures of 40 to 65 degrees below zero. Even if you don’t find yourself in those temperatures, boots that are rated for slightly warmer temperatures are generally based on expectations of heavy activity. Since photography involves frequent stillness, you will need to overcompensate.

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