Photographing Light as Your Subject

Photographing Light as Your Subject

Generally, photographers think of light as the thing that illuminates the subject being photographed. There are times, however, when the light itself can be the subject—or at least an important element of the overall composition. There are several general circumstances when you should consider photographing light as your subject. Sunlight passes through a layer of

Read more »

Read more »

Using Triangles in Landscape Photography

In my over ten years as a professional landscape photographer, I’ve learned that artistic composition—the positioning of visual elements within the picture frame—is vitally important to taking successful photos. A critical component of mastering composition is learning how to recognize and creatively use abstract shapes. When assessing potential landscape subjects, I always keep an eye out for objects that form a triangle shape, as I’ve found that you can make powerful compositions by using triangles in landscape photography.

Read more »

The Best Times to Take Outdoor Photos

I’ve been a professional landscape, nature, and travel photographer for over ten years, and I often get asked the question: what are the best times of day for ta¬king outdoor photographs? The answer, of course, depends in large part on what you are photographing. Outdoor photographers like myself spend weeks in the field hoping for incredible displays of natural light to fully bring their subjects to life. Understanding light, how it changes during the day, and how you can best use the light to your advantage are all critical aspects of successful outdoor photography.

Read more »

Photographing the Falkland Islands

The Falkland Islands, located in the South Atlantic off the coast of South America, are world-renowned for their exceptional wildlife photography opportunities. Large, easily accessible colonies contain tens of thousands of some of the world’s most incredible birds, including five species of penguin, imperial cormorants, and black-browed albatross. Elephant seals, sea lions, and orcas are

Read more »

Read more »

Why Post-Processing Your Water Photos is Different

Whenever I’m teaching someone in a photography workshop or in a classroom setting, I always try to get them into a comfortable workflow they can follow for every photograph they edit. However, every photograph is different which forces the photographer to make decisions on some extra edits they should make. A workflow is important because

Read more »

Read more »

Photographing Early Blooming Spring Flowers

Early blooming flowers provide plenty of opportunities to take great pictures in spring. The variety of colors and species available make for endless creative possibilities. We are also more sensitive to colors after a less saturated winter. Of course, there is always an impulse to imitate pictures we have seen and liked, pictures that inspired

Read more »

Read more »

The One Big Thing About Water Photography

If you’ve been an outdoor photographer for very long you might have noticed by now that you spend a lot of time near the water. There’s no doubt that water features add a lot to any landscape nature scene. Ponds are a tremendous feature to shoot with mountains, waterfalls are always a beautiful cascading subject,

Read more »

Read more »

Photo Composition Tip: Three is a Magic Number

I’m not a big fan of the so-called “Rule of Odds,” which claims that photographic compositions are more visually appealing when there is an odd number of subjects. Of course, depending on your subject matter and overall composition, sometimes an even number of subjects doesn’t work—but then again, sometimes an odd number doesn’t work, either.

Read more »

Read more »