Image Depth

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Duration: 7:23

Many photographers struggle with creating image depth in their compositions. Although photography is a two-dimensional art form, the goal is often to create a three-dimensional composition. For outdoor photography, creating image depth occurs through the use of natural elements. In this premium video, Outdoor Photography Guide’s David Johnston takes you to the woods and shows how to create three dimensions within a two-dimensional space. It all happens through image depth.

David explains that there are several ways to create image depth with the application of natural elements. Probably the most important is the use of weather—for instance, fog and mist. Fog covers up distance between elements. The closer you are, the more you can see. That visible separation between near and far creates the image depth. He shows two images of the same cypress trees he captured in two different weather conditions, one without fog, the other with fog. Clearly, the fog image has more image depth because the nearest element, the cypress trees, are more visible than the wooded background. This technique can also create a mystical appearance.

To achieve the goal of creating image depth, you might want to spend some time scouting your outdoor location in different weather conditions before you even press the shutter. David’s favorite scouting technique is paying attention to fog and mist in creating separation. As an example, he shows his image of spruce trees with a distant layer of fog in the mountain valley, then further on, the mountains. The foreground trees become secluded as the main subject. The background elements create a separation barrier to the trees in the foreground.

To improve your outdoor photography and create image depth, the overall goal is to capture separation between foreground and background. In this premium, video Outdoor Photography Guide’s pro David Johnston shows you how to do this through the use of fog and mist.

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